Adios, FOR Guam interns!

FOR Guam summer interns ended their internship with a final presentation on August 14, 2018 to local partners that participate in conservation on Guam. Click here to view their presentation.

Last Blog entry by Brittany Tominez from their final week of field work:

We started off this week in the office to go over our project. Marilyn, Alysha, and I had a short meeting with Val to discuss our presentation. In addition, Val helped each one of us with the topic we chose to conduct background research for our literature review.

Two days later, Val, Alysha, and I made our way down to Merizo. It was a nice sunny morning with a slight breeze, but as soon as we climbed down to the shore, we were met by the high tide. Rock surfaces that are normally exposed were totally submerged and the water looked like chocolate milk! We thought we would have to reschedule. Val made her way toward our transect sites and to our surprise the water was clear once we got closer! Alysha and I quickly put on our gear and made our way to Val.

Because it has been a few weeks since our last day out in the field, it took some time for us to lay out all six transects. Some of the zip ties were camouflaged as algae grew on them. On one transect, one zip tie had completely come off! Not only was it a little difficult to find the zip ties, but the current was a little stronger than what Alysha and I were used to. This presented an additional challenge to locate our transects.

Once all six transects were laid out, we started the surveys. Val conducted fish surveys,

while Alysha and I did macroinvertebrate surveys. When surveying the transects, Alysha and I noticed that there was already algal growth on the corals that we had removed algae on top a few weeks ago. The two recent storms that passed over and near us over the past few weeks came to mind for this observation. The excess nutrients in the water could have helped with the algae to regrow in these transects. However, it did look like there were more fish in the area after algal removal. The fairly choppy conditions made the hunt for macroinvertebrates a little difficult, but Alysha and I were glad that the water was crystal clear.

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National Coral Reef Management Fellowship Program – JOB OPENINGS!

Unique opportunities to get involved with coral reef conservation… in your own backyard? Read on Guam! You can be a role model to younger Guam students interested in marine biology while you’re at it.

All Islands Coral Reef Blog

by Carey Morishige Martinez, Executive director, AIC Secretariat

Interested in learning more about coral reef ecosystem management in your own backyard?

Looking for a job that will provide solid hands-on resource management experience? 

Working towards building your career in natural resource management related to coral reefs?

Want to be part of the next generation of coral reef conservation leaders?

If you answered YES to any of the above, READ ON…!

Anne Rosinski, previous Hawai'i Coral Reef Management Fellow. Anne Rosinski, previous Hawai’i Coral Reef Management Fellow.

The renewed National Coral Reef Management Fellowship Program provides participants an opportunity to experience and learn about coral reef management within the seven U.S. coral reef jurisdictions that make up the AIC: American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Hawai’i, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This Fellowship Program is a partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Conservation Program

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We’re looking for 2 interns this summer!

Summer’s is practically here! We’re excited to announce the launch of our summer internship program this year.  The Guam Community Coral Reef Monitoring Program is looking for incoming seniors or college level students interested in marine science & education to be our summer interns!  This is a great way to explore the marine science careers, but with the added experience of  working with community to share the importance of Guam’s coral reefs.  A fun opportunity to gain some work experience and meet other people that care for coral reefs!  See below for more details.

Apply now!  GCCRMP 2015 Summer Internship Application

GCCRMP Summer Internship

When: July 13 – August 22, 2015

Objectives:
1) Gain hands-on experience in environmental education, outreach, and stewardship
2) Learn the importance of collaboration and partnerships for community-based initiatives
3) Develop communications skills among various Guam residents, visitors, and local resource managers
4) Expand networking opportunities and explore career paths in marine science and conservation

Tasks
• Prepare training and monitoring survey materials for events
• Assist participants during Classroom and In-Water Training sessions
• Participate/assist at Data Collection events
• Enter data collected from monitoring events
• Update member roster from program events
• Organize program liability release forms and sign-in sheets
• Organize/ maintain community monitoring equipment
• Attend public outreach events and engage with community to promote marine education
• Support program partners’ activities as needed
• Attend community and partner meetings with program staff
• Other duties as assigned

Required
• Willing to work flexible hours and weekends
• Reliable mode of transportation
• Complete Classroom and In-Water Training
• Complete Basic Water Safety training
• Comfortable in the water (preferred)
• Complete Intern Project (see application*)

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