National Coral Reef Management Fellowship Program – JOB OPENINGS!

Unique opportunities to get involved with coral reef conservation… in your own backyard? Read on Guam! You can be a role model to younger Guam students interested in marine biology while you’re at it.

All Islands Coral Reef Blog

by Carey Morishige Martinez, Executive director, AIC Secretariat

Interested in learning more about coral reef ecosystem management in your own backyard?

Looking for a job that will provide solid hands-on resource management experience? 

Working towards building your career in natural resource management related to coral reefs?

Want to be part of the next generation of coral reef conservation leaders?

If you answered YES to any of the above, READ ON…!

Anne Rosinski, previous Hawai'i Coral Reef Management Fellow. Anne Rosinski, previous Hawai’i Coral Reef Management Fellow.

The renewed National Coral Reef Management Fellowship Program provides participants an opportunity to experience and learn about coral reef management within the seven U.S. coral reef jurisdictions that make up the AIC: American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Hawai’i, Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This Fellowship Program is a partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coral Reef Conservation Program

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Reconnecting People & Nature this Science Sunday!

How do you feel after you go for a hike or snorkeling at the beach?  Don’t you just feel calm, relaxed, stress-free.  It’s that positive, serene energy that we feel when we’re experiencing (and appreciating) nature.  Now, expand on that thought..

What motivates us to volunteer to plant trees?  Or to join the Guam Community Coral Reef Monitoring Program to collect data on reef flat health?  Or just to do anything knowing that it will help our natural environment? That drive to “do something” seems natural.  Of course, the world is more beautiful with lush vegetation and amazing coral reefs, but ultimately our life depends on these natural resources.

It’s all about reconnecting people and nature this Sunday.  Guest speaker Romina King will share her thesis that examined communities’ attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions of their watershed.  Conservation and natural resource management isn’t just about protecting animals in this or that ecosystem.  The bottom line is that it’s about PEOPLE and their well-being, long-term. Sometimes the connection between natural resource management and community needs are blurry or confusing.  But the more we “connect the dots” between human benefits and natural resource management efforts, coastal management can be more effective to ensure communities’ are prepared for long-term challenges, like climate change.  It will lead to more public awareness, understand, support, and even more active community participation that will help make Guam’s people mature and grow as the natural stewards of our environment.

Science Sunday_March2015

Coral Bleaching on Guam

Since this original entry, Guam has experienced three more mass coral bleaching events. In 2015, the Eyes of the Reef Marianas (EOR Marianas) was established as a community-based early warning system to invite all ocean users to report coral bleaching and other reef impacts online. Visit eormarianas.org to learn more or to make a report. 

The effects of climate change are a rising concern for Pacific Islanders who find themselves on the front lines. The livelihoods of our brothers and sisters on neighboring islands have been impacted through increased occurrences of droughts and king tides. What about here on Guam? Have we felt the effects of climate change yet?

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Photo credit: Tammy Jo Anderson-Taft, Guam EPA

The answer is YES! Increased and early coral bleaching is only one of the effects brought on by climate change. What is coral bleaching? Coral bleaching occurs when sea water temperatures are too hot or too cold causing corals to stress and expel their zooxanthellae, a special algae that lives in corals, is their main food source, and gives corals their beautiful color. Corals begin to pale and turn stark white when they’re bleached. But there is hope! Corals can survive and recover, but that can take a long time.

Bleached soft corals in Merizo
Bleached soft corals in Merizo. Photo taken July 2014

Last year, Guam and CNMI had a significant coral bleaching event. Even more alarming is the fact that Guam and CNMI were seeing early reports of coral bleaching. Local marine biologist usually expect to see paling/ bleaching corals around October, but there were reports as early as August in 2013. GCCRMP members attended an information session on coral bleaching and helped document bleaching corals at our regular monitoring site at the Piti Bomb Holes Marine Preserve. Members learned how to identify coral bleaching and they can report sightings of coral bleaching. Additionally, Roxanna Miller kicked off our first Science Sunday program with a public talk on coral bleaching. She shared photos and tips on how to identify bleaching or paling corals.

This summer only added to concerns from marine biologists and new concerns brought up by community members. This year, there were reports of coral bleaching as early as June. If you’ve been snorkeling at Ypao Beach this summer, you probably saw large colonies of staghorn corals that were very white or pale-looking. Other areas where coral bleaching has been sighted around Guam is Tumon, Piti, Umatac, and also in Merizo. Last Saturday, GCCRMP members started conducted monitoring surveys in soft coral habitat to help quantify soft coral bleaching in Piti. In addition, members have participated in another reconnaissance survey to look for diseased/sick echinoderms, such as sea cucumbers and sea stars. We’ll continue to work with GCCRMP members to do surveys that can help quantify coral bleaching and track recovery of bleached corals.

GCCRMP Member laying quadrat on paling soft coral
GCCRMP Member laying quadrat on paling soft coral

Ultimately, more Guam residents are aware of the effects of coral bleaching to our reefs and understanding its connection to climate change. GCCRMP members have shared stories of relatives or neighbors asking “why are the corals white?,” which has given them an opportunity to share what they know about coral bleaching.  Want to become a member and help our team collect data?  Email gureefmonitoring@gmail.com or message us on Facebook.